Computing (ICT)

Technology -  Intent

The Axminster Community Primary Academy Curriculum: There are two distinct but related subjects related to Technology :

  • Design and Technologies, in which pupils use design thinking and technologies to generate and produce designed solutions for authentic needs and opportunities
  • Digital Technologies, in which pupils use computational thinking and information systems to define, design and implement digital solutions.

Rationale

Technologies enhance and influence the lives of people and societies globally. Pupils in Axminster Academy need to be  enterprising individuals who can make intelligent decisions about the development and use of technologies and who can independently and collaboratively develop solutions to complex challenges and contribute to sustainable patterns of living. Technologies can play an important role in transforming, restoring and sustaining societies and natural, managed and constructed environments.

Within the Axminster Community Primary Academy Curriculum the subject - Technologies -  ensures that all pupils benefit from learning about and working with traditional, contemporary and emerging technologies that shape the world in which we live. By applying their knowledge and practical skills and processes when using technologies and other resources to create innovative solutions, independently and collaboratively, they develop knowledge, understanding and skills to respond creatively to current and future needs. The practical nature of the Technologies learning area engages pupils in critical and creative thinking, including understanding interrelationships in systems when solving complex problems. A systematic approach to experimentation, problem-solving, prototyping and evaluation instils in pupils the value of planning and reviewing processes to realise ideas.

All young citizens (especially those in Axminster) should develop capacity for action and a critical appreciation of the processes through which technologies are developed and how technologies can contribute to society. Pupils need opportunities to consider the use and impact of technological solutions on equity, ethics, and personal and social values. In creating solutions, as well as responding to the designed world, pupils consider desirable sustainable patterns of living, and contribute to preferred futures for themselves and others.

Intent

The Axminster Community Primary Curriculum: Technologies aims to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills to ensure that, individually and collaboratively, pupils:

  • investigate, design, plan, manage, create and evaluate solutions
  • are creative, innovative and enterprising when using traditional, contemporary and emerging technologies, and understand how technologies have developed over time
  • make informed and ethical decisions about the role, impact and use of technologies in the economy, environment and society for a sustainable future
  • engage confidently with and responsibly select and manipulate appropriate technologies − materials, data, systems, components, tools and equipment − when designing and creating solutions
  • critique, analyse and evaluate problems, needs or opportunities to identify and create solutions.

Overarching idea: Creating preferred futures

The Technologies curriculum provides pupils with opportunities to consider how solutions that are created now will be used in the future. Pupils will identify the possible benefits and risks of creating solutions. They will use critical and creative thinking to weigh up possible short- and long-term impacts.

As pupils progress through the Technologies curriculum, they will begin to identify possible and probable futures, and their preferences for the future. They develop solutions to meet needs considering impacts on liveability, economic prosperity and environmental sustainability. Pupils will learn to recognise that views about the priority of the benefits and risks will vary and that preferred futures are contested.

Project management

Our pupils will develop skills to manage projects to successful completion through planning, organising and monitoring timelines, activities and the use of resources. This includes considering resources and constraints to develop resource, finance, work and time plans; assessing and managing risks; making decisions; controlling quality; evaluating processes and collaborating and communicating with others at different stages of the process - this specifically targets skills that we know the children struggle with - through having to apply these skills and be reflective and evaluative of their contribution we will cultivate and improve these skill sets. 

Pupils are taught to plan for sustainable use of resources when managing projects and take into account ethical, health and safety considerations and personal and social beliefs and values.

Thinking in Technologies

Systems thinking

A system is an organised group of related objects or components that form a whole. Systems thinking is an holistic approach to the identification and solving of problems where the focal points are treated as components of a system, and their interactions and interrelationships are analysed individually to see how they influence the functioning of the entire system.

In Design and Technologies, the success of designed solutions includes the generation of ideas and decisions made throughout design processes. It requires pupils to understand systems and work with complexity, uncertainty and risk. Pupils recognise the connectedness of and interactions between people, places and events in local and wider world contexts and consider the impact their designs and actions have in a connected world.

Participating in and shaping the future of information and digital systems is an integral part of learning in Digital Technologies. Understanding the complexity of systems and the interdependence of components is necessary to create timely solutions to technical, economic and social problems. Implementation of digital solutions often has consequences for the people who use and engage with the system, and may introduce unintended costs or benefits that impact the present or future society.

Design thinking

Design thinking involves the use of strategies for understanding design needs and opportunities, visualising and generating creative and innovative ideas, planning, and analysing and evaluating those ideas that best meet the criteria for success. Design thinking underpins learning in Design and Technologies. Design processes require pupils to identify and investigate a need or opportunity; generate, plan and realise designed solutions; and evaluate products and processes. Consideration of economic, environmental and social impacts that result from designed solutions are core to design thinking, design processes and Design and Technologies.When developing solutions in Digital Technologies, pupils explore, analyse and develop ideas based on data, inputs and human interactions. When pupils design a solution to a problem they consider how users will be presented with data, the degree of interaction with that data and the various types of computational processing. For example, designing a maze; writing precise and accurate sequences of instructions to move a robot through the maze or testing the program and modifying the solution.

Computational thinking

Computational thinking is a problem-solving method that is applied to create solutions that can be implemented using digital technologies. It involves integrating strategies, such as organising data logically, breaking down problems into parts, interpreting patterns and models and designing and implementing algorithms. Computational thinking is used when specifying and implementing algorithmic solutions to problems in Digital Technologies. For a computer to be able to process data through a series of logical and ordered steps, pupils must be able to take an abstract idea and break it down into defined, simple tasks that produce an outcome. This may include analysing trends in data, responding to user input under certain preconditions or predicting the outcome of a simulation.

This type of thinking is used in Design and Technologies during different phases of a design process when computation is needed to quantify data and solve problems. Examples include when calculating costs, testing materials and components, comparing performance or modelling trends.

Information and communication technology in the Axminster Curriculum

In our curriculum, there are opportunities in all learning areas to develop information and communication technology (ICT) capability. These are described in the ICT general capability learning continuum, which is a statement about learning opportunities in the Axminster curriculum for pupils to develop their ICT capability.

In Digital Technologies the ICT capability is more explicit and foregrounded. Pupils develop explicit knowledge, understanding and skills relating to operating and managing ICT and applying social and ethical protocols while investigating, creating and communicating. The study of Digital Technologies will ensure that ICT capability is developed systematically. While specific elements are likely to be addressed within Digital Technologies learning programs, key concepts and skills are strengthened, complemented and extended across all subjects, including in Design and Technologies. This occurs as pupils engage in a range of learning activities with digital technologies requirements.

The clear difference between the Digital Technologies curriculum and the ICT general capability is that the capability helps pupils to become effective users of digital technologies while the Digital Technologies curriculum helps pupils to become confident developers of digital solutions.

Safety

Identifying and managing risk in Technologies learning addresses the safe use of technologies as well as risks that can impact on project timelines. It covers all necessary aspects of health, safety and injury prevention and, in any technologies context, the use of potentially dangerous materials, tools and equipment. It includes digital citizenship and digital resilience , ergonomics, safety including cyber safety, data security, and ethical and legal considerations when communicating and collaborating online.

Technologies learning experiences may involve the use of potentially hazardous substances and/or hazardous equipment. It is the responsibility of the school to ensure that duty of care is exercised in relation to the health and safety of all pupils and that school practices meet the requirements of the the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974

In implementing projects with a focus on food, care must be taken with regard to food safety and specific food allergies that may result in adverse reactions eg anaphalaxis.

The curriculum for each of Design and Technologies and Digital Technologies describes the distinct knowledge, understanding and skills of the subject and, where appropriate, highlights their similarities and complementary learning. This approach allows pupils to develop a comprehensive understanding of traditional, contemporary and emerging technologies. It also provides the flexibility – especially in the primary years of schooling – for developing integrated teaching programs that focus on both Technologies subjects and other learning areas. Figure 1 shows the relationship between the overarching idea, key ideas and subjects of the Technologies learning area.

The curriculum for each Technologies subject is written in bands of year levels:

Foundation – Year 2

Years 3 and 4

Years 5 and 6

Design and Technologies

Digital Technologies

Knowledge and understanding

Knowledge and understanding

Technologies and society

  • the use, development and impact of technologies in people’s lives

Technologies contexts

  • technologies and design across a range of technologies contexts

Digital systems

  • the components of digital systems: hardware, software and networks and their use

Representation of data

  • how data are represented and structured symbolically

Processes and production skills

Processes and production skills

Creating designed solutions by:

  • investigating and defining
  • generating and designing
  • producing and implementing
  • evaluating
  • collaborating and managing

Collecting, managing and analysing data

Creating digital solutions by:

  • investigating and defining
  • generating and designing
  • producing and implementing
  • evaluating
  • collaborating and managing

Design and Technologies: Sequence of achievement F-6



Foundation to Year 2

By the end of Year 2, pupils describe the purpose of familiar products, services and environments and how they meet the needs of users and affect others and environments. They identify the features and uses of technologies for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. With guidance, pupils create designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. They describe given needs or opportunities. Pupils create and evaluate their ideas and designed solutions based on personal preferences. They communicate design ideas for their designed products, services and environments using modelling and simple drawings. Following sequenced steps, pupils demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment when producing designed solutions.

Years 3 and 4 

By the end of Year 4, pupils explain how products, services and environments are designed to best meets the needs of communities and their environments. They describe contributions of people in design and technologies occupations. Pupils describe how the features of technologies can be used to help and produce designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. Pupils create designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. They explain needs or opportunities and evaluate ideas and designed solutions against identified criteria for success, including environmental sustainability considerations. They develop and expand design ideas and communicate these using models and drawings including annotations and symbols. Pupils plan and sequence major steps in design and production. They identify appropriate technologies and techniques and demonstrate safe work practices when producing designed solutions.  

Years 5 and 6 

By the end of Year 6, pupils describe competing considerations in the design of products, services and environments, taking into account sustainability. They describe how design and technologies contribute to meeting present and future needs. Pupils explain how the features of technologies impact on designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. Pupils create designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts suitable for identified needs or opportunities. They suggest criteria for success, including sustainability considerations, and use these to evaluate their ideas and designed solutions. They combine design ideas and communicate these to audiences using graphical representation techniques and technical terms. Pupils record project plans including production processes. They select and use appropriate technologies and techniques correctly and safely to produce designed solutions. 

Digital Technologies: Sequence of achievement F-6



Foundation to Year 2

By the end of Year 2, pupils identify how common digital systems (hardware and software) are used to meet specific purposes. They use digital systems to represent simple patterns in data in different ways. Pupils design solutions to simple problems using a sequence of steps and decisions. They collect familiar data and display them to convey meaning. They create and organise ideas and information using information systems, and share information in safe online environments. 

Years 3 and 4 

By the end of Year 4, pupils describe how a range of digital systems (hardware and software) and their peripheral devices can be used for different purposes. They explain how the same data sets can be represented in different ways. Pupils define simple problems, design and implement digital solutions using algorithms that involve decision-making and user input. They explain how the solutions meet their purposes. They collect and manipulate different data when creating information and digital solutions. They safely use and manage information systems for identified needs using agreed protocols and describe how information systems are used. 

Years 5 and 6 

By the end of Year 6, pupils explain the fundamentals of digital system components (hardware, software and networks) and how digital systems are connected to form networks. They explain how digital systems use whole numbers as a basis for representing a variety of data types. Pupils define problems in terms of data and functional requirements and design solutions by developing algorithms to address the problems. They incorporate decision-making, repetition and user interface design into their designs and implement their digital solutions, including a visual program. They explain how information systems and their solutions meet needs and consider sustainability. Pupils manage the creation and communication of ideas and information in collaborative digital projects using validated data and agreed protocols. 






Challenge - the Challenge here is to ensure that teachers have this knowledge - CPD























Foundation to Year 2 - Intent 

Learning in Design and Technologies builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in the Early Years Learning Framework, revisiting, strengthening and extending these as needed.

By the end of Year 2 pupils will have had the opportunity to create designed solutions at least once in each of the following technologies contexts: Engineering principles and systems; Food and fibre production and Food specialisations; and Materials and technologies specialisations. Pupils should have opportunities to experience designing and producing products, services and environments. This may occur through integrated learning.

In Foundation to Year 2 pupils explore and investigate technologies − materials, systems, components, tools and equipment − including their purpose and how they meet personal and social needs within local settings. Pupils develop an understanding of how society and environmental sustainability factors influence design and technologies decisions. Pupils evaluate designed solutions using questions such as ‘How does it work?’, ‘What purpose does it meet?’, ‘Who will use it?’, ‘What do I like about it?’ or ‘How can it be improved?’ They begin to consider the impact of their decisions and of technologies on others and the environment including in relation to preferred futures. They reflect on their participation in a design process. This involves pupils developing new perspectives, and engaging in different forms of evaluating and critiquing products, services and environments based on personal preferences.

Using a range of technologies including a variety of graphical representation techniques to communicate, pupils draw, model and explain design ideas; label drawings; draw objects as two-dimensional images from different views; draw products and simple environments and verbalise design ideas.

They plan (with teacher support) simple steps and follow directions to complete their own or group design ideas or projects, and manage their own role within team projects. Pupils are aware of others around them and the need to work safely and collaboratively when making designed solutions.

Foundation to Year 2 Content - Intent 

Design and technologies knowledge and understanding 



Children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. They select and use technology for particular purposes.


Reception - ELG


  • Acquire basic skills in turning on and operating some ICT equipment.
  • Operate mechanical toys

  • Operate simple equipment
  • Operate technological toys with knobs or pulleys, or real objects such as cameras or mobile phones.
  • Make toys work by pressing parts or lifting flaps to achieve effects such as sound, movements or new images.
  • Retrieve information from computers

  • Complete a simple program on a computer.
  • Use ICT hardware to interact with age-appropriate computer software.

Explore how plants and animals are grown for food, clothing and shelter and how food is selected and prepared for healthy eating


  • Animals, plants & nutrition 
  • exploring which plants and animals can provide food or materials for clothing and shelter and what basic needs those plants and animals have

  • identifying products that can be designed and produced from plants and animals, for example food products, paper and wood products, fabrics and yarns, and fertilisers

  • identifying and categorising a wide range of foods into food groups and describing tools and equipment needed to prepare these for healthy eating

  • exploring how people from different cultures including those in Axminster design and produce different cuisines based on the plants and animals in their region and available tools and equipment

  • exploring the tools, equipment and techniques used to prepare food safely and hygienically for healthy eating

Identify how people design and produce familiar products, services and environments and consider sustainability to meet personal and local community need


  • Recycling 
  • exploring how local products, services and environments are designed by people for a purpose and meet social needs, for example the range of shelters provided for the public in a local community; graphical displays to market school and community events

  • asking questions about natural and managed environments and impacts on them when selecting materials, tools and equipment when designing and making products, for example harvesting products from the school garden and using recycled clothing

  • making design decisions based on personal and family needs, for example downloading and comparing recipes to suit available cooking facilities such as cooking in the bush compared to cooking in a kitchen

  • exploring and critiquing products, services and environments for their impact on sustainability, for example the environmental risks and benefits of a system for organically or hydroponically growing a vegetable crop from seed or seedling to harvest

Explore how technologies use forces to create movement in products



  • Forces and Materials 
  • exploring how the principles of push and pull are used in the design of toys, for example in a spinning toy such as a wooden spinning top

  • identifying, and playing and experimenting with, components such as wheels, balls, slides, springs and available local materials, tools and equipment to solve problems requiring movement

  • selecting materials to demonstrate how material properties are appropriate for particular designed solutions, for example materials that enable sliding or floating

  • exploring a system such as a marionette or Indonesian wayang kulit shadow puppet to see that by combining materials with forces, movement can be created

  • combining materials and using forces in design, for example designing the door on a cage or a simple conveyor belt to move materials short distances

  • exploring how to manipulate materials using a range of tools, equipment and techniques to create movement, for example when constructing a toy boat that floats and moves

Explore the characteristics and properties of materials and components that are used to produce designed solutions


  • Tooling and adapting 
  • exploring designed solutions to meet individual, family and community needs with a focus on materials, for example fabrics used for sports clothing, soft fall for play spaces

  • considering the suitability of a range of tools when cultivating gardens, mulching and building garden structures and preparing and cooking food from recipes

  • developing new meanings for objects and action during play, for example exploring how household packaging can be used to represent other objects

  • exploring systems used in the classroom or community for creatively dealing with problems and needs, for example storage systems for equipment, traffic system flow for drop and go zones, the use of hoists and ramps to facilitate access

  • exploring facilities in local environments for accessibility and environmental impact, for example location of bike tracks and sporting fields using digital maps to view local area

  • exploring materials, components, tools and equipment through play to discover potential uses when making products or modelling services and environments, for example when designing and making clothes, toys and shelters

  • experimenting with techniques to combine or alter materials to satisfy a function

Design and technologies - Processes and production 

Explore needs or opportunities for designing, and the technologies needed to realise designed solutions


  • Design
  • identifying, gathering and playing with materials, components, tools and equipment to generate personal design ideas, for example designing a greeting card for a friend

  • exploring opportunities around the school for designing solutions, for example how school play areas could be improved; how the school removes classroom waste and identifying opportunities to reduce, recycle and re-use materials; reviewing the school dinner menu to identify healthy food options and suggesting changes to promote future good health

  • discussing possible designed solutions based on experience and some research, for example asking adults for advice

  • considering the importance of sustainability in designed solutions, for example comparing the durability of materials for a selected solution

  • exploring which tools, equipment and techniques to use with selected materials

Generate, develop and record design ideas through describing, drawing and modelling


  • Design 
  • comparing and contrasting features of existing products to provide new ideas, for example exploring toys with several movable parts with the view to designing and making a simple puppet with one movable part

  • communicating design ideas by modelling, and producing and labelling two-dimensional drawings using a range of technologies to show different views (top view and side view), for example a new environment such as a cubby house or animal shelter

  • recording a judgement about design ideas with teacher guidance, for example expressing own likes and dislikes about a design idea

  • identifying one common testing method, and recording results, for example taste-testing comparisons of a food product and recording results in a digital form

  • describing how design ideas meet the needs of those who will use the solution

Use materials, components, tools, equipment and techniques to safely make designed solutions


  • Make 
  • using and playing with everyday materials in new ways or re-using discarded materials, for example using discarded materials to design, make and model a constructed environment

  • learning and safely practising a range of technical skills using tools and equipment, for example joining techniques when making products, watering and mulching gardens, preparing food, using software to design an environment

  • assembling components of systems and checking they function as planned, for example when making a musical instrument

Use personal preferences to evaluate the success of design ideas, processes and solutions including their care for environment 


  • Evaluate 
  • developing criteria for success with teacher guidance including consideration of impact on environment

  • recording a judgment about design ideas with teacher guidance, for example expressing own likes and dislikes about a design idea

  • reflecting on the processes and challenges of designing and producing a solution and sharing these reflections using digital technologies, for example when growing a food product, designing a structure to take a load or making a nutritious snack

  • suggesting areas for design improvement

Sequence steps for making designed solutions and working collaboratively



  • Quality control

 

  • checking that planned features have been included in design plans and drawings by referring to identified criteria for success including care for the environment
  • using lists or storyboarding when planning and making, for example when planning an electronic planting calendar
  • recording the procedure for making a product, for example a recipe or instructions for making a container
  • identifying roles for each member of a group when working collaboratively

By the end of Year 2, pupils describe the purpose of familiar products, services and environments and how they meet a range of present needs. They list the features of technologies that influence design decisions and identify how digital systems are used.


By the end of Year 2, pupils describe the purpose of familiar products, services and environments and how they meet the needs of users and affect others and environments. They identify the features and uses of technologies for each of the prescribed technologies contexts.

With guidance, pupils create designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. They describe given needs or opportunities. Pupils create and evaluate their ideas and designed solutions based on personal preferences. They communicate design ideas for their designed products, services and environments using modelling and simple drawings. Following sequenced steps, pupils demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment when producing designed solutions.

Years 3 and 4 - Intent 

Years 3 and 4 Band Description

Learning in Design and Technologies builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit, strengthen and extend these as needed.

By the end of Year 4 pupils will have had the opportunity to create designed solutions at least once in the following technologies contexts: Engineering principles and systems; Food and fibre production and Food specialisations; and Materials and technologies specialisations. Pupils should have opportunities to experience designing and producing products, services and environments.

In Year 3 and 4 pupils develop a sense of self and ownership of their ideas and thinking about their peers and communities and as consumers. Pupils explore and learn to harness their creative, innovative and imaginative ideas and approaches to achieve designed products, services and environments. They do this through planning and awareness of the characteristics and properties of materials and the use of tools and equipment. They learn to reflect on their actions to refine their working and develop their decision-making skills. Pupils examine social and environmental sustainability implications of existing products and processes to raise awareness of their place in the world. They compare their predicted implications with real-world case studies including those from Europe, and recognise that designs and technologies can affect people and their environments. They become aware of the role of those working in design and technologies occupations and how they think about the way a product might change in the future.

Using a range of technologies including a variety of graphical representation techniques to communicate, pupils clarify and present ideas, for example by drawing annotated diagrams; modelling objects as three-dimensional images from different views by visualising rotating images and using materials. Pupils recognise techniques for documenting design and production ideas such as basic drawing symbols, and use simple flow diagrams.

Pupils become aware of the appropriate ways to manage their projects and time effectively. With teacher guidance, they identify and list criteria for success including in relation to preferred futures and the major steps needed to complete a design task. They show an understanding of the importance of planning when designing solutions, in particular when collaborating. Pupils identify safety issues and learn to follow simple safety rules when producing designed solutions.

Design and technologies knowledge and understanding

Recognise the role of people in design and technologies occupations and explore factors, including sustainability that impact on the design of products, services and environments to meet community need




  • Environmental factors
  • exploring, playing with and testing materials for their appropriateness, for example materials for a new sun-shade product

  • examining the suitability of a service or everyday system and proposing improvements, for example a water saving system for a bathroom at home

  • investigating materials, components, tools and equipment, including by using digital technologies, to discover their characteristics and properties, how they can be used more sustainably and their impact in the future

  • considering the impact of environments on users, for example a school vegetable garden, a protected outdoor play area

  • exploring and testing factors that impact on design decisions, for example considering the demographics of an area or the impact of natural disasters on design of constructed environments such as the structural design of buildings in Italy to withstand earthquakes

  • critiquing designed products, services and environments to establish the factors that influence the design and use of common technologies, for example the characteristics that contribute to energy-efficient cooking such as wok cooking; the suitability and sustainable use of particular timbers

Investigate how forces and the properties of materials affect the behaviour of a product or system



  • Forces
  • examining models to identify how forces and materials are used in the design of a toy

  • exploring, through play, how movement can be initiated by combining materials and using forces, for example releasing a wound rubber band to propel a model boat

  • conducting investigations to understand the characteristics and properties of materials and forces that may affect the behaviour and performance of a product or system

  • deconstructing a product or system to identify how motion and forces affect behaviour, for example in a puppet such as a Japanese bunraku puppet or a model windmill with moving sails

  • identifying and exploring properties and construction relationships of an engineered product or system, for example a structure that floats; a bridge to carry a load

  • experimenting with available local materials, tools and equipment to solve problems requiring forces including identifying inputs (what goes in to the system), processes (what happens within the system) and outputs (what comes out of the system), for example designing and testing a container or parachute that will keep an egg intact when dropped from a height

Investigate food and fibre production and food technologies used in modern and traditional societies



  • Animals, Food & Plants
  • exploring tools, equipment and procedures to improve plant and animal production, for example when growing vegetables in the school garden and producing plant and animal environments such as a greenhouse, animal housing, safe bird shelters

  • identifying the areas in the UK and Devon where major food or fibre plants and animals are grown or bred.

  • describing ideal conditions for successful plant and animal production including how climate and soils affect production and availability of foods, for example UK seasons and food availability

  • recognising the benefits food technologies provide for health and food safety and ensuring that a wide variety of food is available and can be prepared for healthy eating

  • investigating the labels on food products to determine how the information provided contributes to healthy eating, for example ingredients and nutrition panels

investigate the suitability of materials, systems, components, tools and equipment for a range of purposes



  • Production
  • conducting experiments and tests to understand the properties of materials, for example strength, durability, warmth, elasticity

  • investigating the mass production of products to ensure standardisation, for example pupils setting up a production line to produce a product for a school fete

  • investigating the suitability of technologies − materials, systems, components, tools and equipment − when designing and making a product, service or environment, for example a toy for a young child, a composting system for household waste management, raised garden beds for improved access, weaving nets, bags or baskets

  • comparing how different components interrelate and complement each other in a finished designed solution, for example investigating and playing with joining processes for a variety of materials in the production of common products

  • investigating local constructed environments to compare how buildings were constructed in the past and in the present, particularly noting innovations

  • analysing products, services and constructed environments from a range of technologies contexts with consideration of possible innovative solutions and impacts on the local community and the sustainability of its environment

Design and technology - Processes and production 

Critique needs or opportunities for designing and explore and test a variety of materials, components, tools and equipment and the techniques needed to produce designed solutions



  • Evaluate
  • exploring the different uses of materials in a range of products, including those from local communities and countries in the UK/Europe

  • critiquing and selecting appropriate joining techniques for materials to produce working models

  • exploring and testing a range of materials under different conditions for suitability including sustainability considerations and identifying appropriate tools, equipment and techniques

  • examining the structure and production of everyday products, services and environments to enhance their own design ideas

  • exploring the properties of materials to determine suitability, for example the absorbency of different fabrics or the strength of different resistant materials

Generate, develop, and communicate design ideas and decisions using appropriate technical terms and graphical representation techniques


  • Design
  • exploring ways of joining, connecting and assembling components that ensure success

  • generating a range of design ideas for intended products, services, environments

  • identifying the properties of materials needed for the designed solution

  • visualising and exploring innovative design ideas by producing thumbnail drawings, models and labelled drawings to explain features and modifications

  • planning, sharing and documenting creative ideas and processes using digital tools such as a class blog or collaborative document

Select and use materials, components, tools, equipment and techniques and use safe work practices to make designed solutions



  • Make
  • using appropriate technologies terms to confidently describe and share with others procedures and techniques for making, for example cutting and joining materials

  • exploring ways of joining, connecting and assembling components that ensure success, and the impact digital technologies have had on these processes

  • using tools and equipment accurately when measuring, marking and cutting; and explaining the importance of accuracy when designing and making, for example creating a template, measuring ingredients in a recipe, sowing seeds

  • selecting and using materials, components, tools, equipment and processes with consideration of the environmental impact at each stage of the production process

  • demonstrating safe, responsible and cooperative work practices when making designed solutions

Evaluate design ideas, processes and solutions based on criteria for success developed with guidance and including care for the environment



  • Evaluate
  • negotiating criteria for success with class or group members

  • evaluating, revising and selecting design ideas, based on criteria for success and including consideration of ethics, social values and sustainability

  • evaluating the functional and aesthetic qualities of a designed solution

  • reflecting on the sustainability implications of selected designed solutions

  • comparing the amount of waste that would be produced from different design and development options and the potential for recycling waste

  • reflecting on designed solutions to critique and assess suitability, sustainability and enterprise opportunities and determine how well they meet success criteria

Plan a sequence of production steps when making designed solutions individually and collaboratively



  • Design / Evaluate
  • negotiating criteria for success with class or group members

  • evaluating, revising and selecting design ideas, based on criteria for success and including consideration of ethics, social values and sustainability

  • evaluating the functional and aesthetic qualities of a designed solution

  • reflecting on the sustainability implications of selected designed solutions

  • comparing the amount of waste that would be produced from different design and development options and the potential for recycling waste

  • reflecting on designed solutions to critique and assess suitability, sustainability and enterprise opportunities and determine how well they meet success criteria

By the end of Year 4, pupils describe how social, technical and sustainability factors influence the design of solutions to meet present and future needs. They describe features of technologies that influence design decisions and how a range of digital systems can be used.


Pupils outline and define needs, opportunities or problems. They collect, manipulate and interpret data from a range of sources to support decisions. Pupils generate and record design ideas for an audience using technical terms and graphical and non-graphical representation techniques including algorithms. They plan a sequence of steps (algorithms) to create solutions, including visual programs. Pupils plan and safely produce designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. They use identified criteria for success, including sustainability considerations, to judge the suitability of their ideas, solutions and processes. Pupils use agreed protocols when collaborating, and creating and communicating ideas, information and solutions face-to-face and online.



By the end of Year 4, pupils explain how products, services and environments are designed to best meet the needs of communities and their environments. They describe contributions of people in design and technologies occupations. Pupils describe how the features of technologies can be used to produce designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts.

Pupils create designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. They explain needs or opportunities and evaluate ideas and designed solutions against identified criteria for success, including environmental sustainability considerations. They develop and expand design ideas and communicate these using models and drawings including annotations and symbols. Pupils plan and sequence major steps in design and production. They identify appropriate technologies and techniques and demonstrate safe work practices when producing designed solutions.

Years 5 and 6 - Intent 

Learning in Design and Technologies builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit, strengthen and extend these as needed.

By the end of Year 6, Pupils will have had the opportunity to create designed solutions at least once in three technologies contexts: engineering principles and systems, food and fibre production and food specialisations; and materials and technologies specialisations. Pupils should have opportunities to experience designing and producing products, services and environments.

In Years 5 and 6, Pupils critically examine technologies − materials, systems, components, tools and equipment − that are used regularly in the home and in local, national, regional or global communities, with consideration of society, ethics and social and environmental sustainability factors. Pupils consider why and for whom technologies were developed.

Pupils engage with ideas beyond the familiar, exploring how design and technologies and the people working in a range of technologies contexts contribute to society. They seek to explore innovation and establish their own design capabilities. Pupils are given new opportunities for clarifying their thinking, creativity, analysis, problem-solving and decision-making. They explore trends and data to imagine what the future will be like and suggest design decisions that contribute positively to preferred futures.

Using a range of technologies including a variety of graphical representation techniques to communicate, pupils represent objects and ideas in a variety of forms such as thumbnail sketches, models, drawings, diagrams and storyboards to illustrate the development of designed solutions. They use a range of techniques such as labelling and annotating sequenced sketches and diagrams to illustrate how products function; and recognise and use a range of drawing symbols in context to give meaning and direction.

Pupils work individually and collaboratively to identify and sequence steps needed for a design task. They negotiate and develop plans to complete design tasks, and follow plans to complete design tasks safely, making adjustments to plans when necessary. Pupils identify, plan and maintain safety standards and practices when making designed solutions.

Design and technologies knowledge and understanding 

Examine how people in design and technologies occupations address competing considerations, including sustainability in the design of products, services, and environments for current and future use

  • reflecting on the features of designed solutions that ensure safety and wellbeing of users, for example smoke alarms

  • evaluating the sustainability implications of materials, systems, components, tools and equipment, for example materials can be recycled or re-used to reduce waste; systems may benefit some, but disadvantage others

  • considering the impact designed products, services or environments have in relation to sustainability and also on local, regional and global communities, including Axminster, Devon/Dorset and South West England

  • reflecting on the importance of aesthetics, function and sustainability in product design, for example a textile product that gives protection and is appealing; a motor that moves a vehicle and uses a sustainable power source

  • identifying the components of a service or system that contribute to its success and assessing potential risk or failure, for example, communication in the school or communication of a message to a wide audience; a system that manages an aspect of the environment.

  • identifying the impact of the designed features of an environment, for example a modification to a home to reduce environmental impact; restoring a natural environment and retaining access for the public

Investigate how electrical energy can control movement, sound or light in a designed product or system

  • deconstructing a product or system to discover how movement, sound or light can be controlled, for example deconstructing a torch or buzzer and exploring circuit design

  • investigating the properties of materials to solve problems requiring the control of movement, sound or light, for example the amount of light reflected from different surfaces to control a sensor

  • investigating the features of electrical devices such as switches, light globes and sensors

  • recognising the need to carefully plan and select components for a system to perform a specific task

  • producing models using materials, tools and equipment to show how to control movement, sound or light

  • investigating the technologies in a control system for an identified need or opportunity and user, for example a system that allows safe passage at pedestrian crossings

Investigate how and why food and fibre are produced in managed environments and prepared to enable people to grow and be healthy

  • investigating and experimenting with different tools, equipment and methods of preparing soil and the effect on soil quality and sustainability including conserving and recycling nutrients, for example when designing a sustainable school vegetable garden or cropping area

  • describing the relationship between plant types and animal breeds and their environmental suitability when selecting suitable plants or animals for an environment

  • sequencing the process of converting ‘on-farm’ food or fibre products into a product suitable for retail sale, that is, the ‘paddock to plate’ supply chain, or when making yarn or fabric from fibre

  • Consider the ethical and environmental impact of intensive farming and fishing

  • using current food guides and government-endorsed food policies to plan food choices

  • experimenting with tools, equipment, combining ingredients and techniques to design and make food products or meals for selected groups for healthy eating taking into consideration environmental impacts and nutritional benefits

  • considering traditional and contemporary methods of food preparation used in a variety of cultures, including local Devon methods

  • identifying work practices that show an understanding of nutrition, environmental considerations, hygiene and food safety when designing and making a food product, for example washing fruit and vegetables carefully to remove residues, safe disposal of cooking oils to avoid environmental damage, refrigerated storage of highly perishable foods

Investigate characteristics and properties of a range of materials, systems, components, tools and equipment and evaluate the impact of their use

  • identifying the properties of materials for the design and construction of a sustainable household item, for example a product for storing harvested water

  • evaluating the functional properties of a specific-purpose household system, for example a security system

  • examining the materials and systems used in a public use system that affect the way people live, for example a community exercise environment or arts facility, water treatment, garbage collection

  • comparing tools, equipment and techniques to select those most appropriate for a given purpose

  • evaluating the use of computer-aided manufacturing in terms of cost and impacts on local and regional designers, producers and enterprises

  • comparing the design and production of products, services and environments in the UK and Europe

Design and technology - Processes and production 

Critique needs or opportunities for designing, and investigate materials, components, tools, equipment and processes to achieve intended designed solutions

  • exploring the steps involved in the process to satisfy a design brief, need or opportunity

  • investigating designed solutions from around the world to make suitable, quality decisions that meet the design brief, challenge or scenario

  • identifying the importance of complementary parts of working, everyday systems by deconstructing the components, structure and purpose of products, services or environments

  • testing a range of materials, components, tools and equipment to determine the appropriate technologies needed to make products, services or environments, for example a moving vehicle

  • investigating how to minimise material use and manage waste by critiquing the environmental and social impacts of materials, components, tools and equipment

Generate, develop and communicate design ideas and processes for audiences using appropriate technical terms and graphical representation techniques

  • generating a range of design ideas for products, services or environments using prior knowledge, skills and research

  • developing alternative design ideas and considering implications for the future to broaden the appeal and acceptance of design ideas

  • analysing and modifying design ideas to enhance and improve the sustainability of the product, service, environment or system

  • representing and communicating design ideas using modelling and drawing standards including the use of digital technologies, for example scale; symbols and codes in diagrams; pictorial maps and aerial views using web mapping service applications

  • experimenting with materials, tools and equipment to refine design ideas, for example considering the selection of materials and joining techniques to suit the purpose of a product

Select appropriate materials, components, tools, equipment and techniques and apply safe procedures to make designed solutions

  • matching material and joining techniques to the design intention, for example accurately cutting and sewing the fabric pieces to make a community banner or joining components to produce an electric circuit

  • working safely, responsibly and cooperatively to ensure safe work areas, for example the safe use of equipment when making a water-resistant, floating craft or a model of an environmentally sensitive outdoor shelter

  • using appropriate personal protective equipment required for the use of some tools and equipment, for example protective eyewear

  • manipulating materials with appropriate tools, equipment and techniques, for example when preparing food, cultivating garden beds, constructing products

Negotiate criteria for success that include sustainability to evaluate design ideas, processes and solutions

  • independently and collaboratively identifying criteria for success, processes and planning, for example using visual representations such as a flowchart

  • evaluating the suitability of materials, tools and equipment for specific purposes

  • reflecting on how well their designed solutions ensure safety and wellbeing of users and consumers and meet the needs of communities and different cultures

  • considering the criteria for success in relation to the benefits and costs of production processes, the environmental impact, future use and application, and social values and ethics of clients

  • evaluating products, services and environments from a range of technologies contexts with consideration of ethics and sustainability

Develop project plans that include consideration of resources when making designed solutions individually and collaboratively

  • examining the essential features of existing processes to inform project planning including safe work practices that minimise risk

  • setting milestones for production processes and allocating roles to team members

  • identifying when materials, tools and equipment are required for making the solution

  • outlining the planning and production steps needed to produce a product, service or environment using digital technologies

  • reflecting on planned steps to see if improvements can be made

By the end of Year 6, Pupils explain how social, ethical, technical and sustainability considerations influence the design of solutions to meet a range of present and future needs. They explain how the features of technologies influence design decisions and how digital systems are connected to form networks.

Pupils describe a range of needs, opportunities or problems and define them in terms of functional requirements. They collect and validate data from a range of sources to assist in making judgements. Pupils generate and record design ideas for specified audiences using appropriate technical terms, and graphical and non-graphical representation techniques including algorithms. They plan, design, test, modify and create digital solutions that meet intended purposes including user interfaces and a visual program. Pupils plan and document processes and resources and safely produce designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts. They negotiate criteria for success, including sustainability considerations, and use these to judge the suitability of their ideas, solutions and processes. Pupils use ethical, social and technical protocols when collaborating, and creating and communicating ideas, information and solutions face-to-face and online.

By the end of Year 6, Pupils describe competing considerations in the design of products, services and environments, taking into account sustainability. They describe how design and technologies contribute to meeting present and future needs. Pupils explain how the features of technologies impact on designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts.

Pupils create designed solutions for each of the prescribed technologies contexts suitable for identified needs or opportunities. They suggest criteria for success, including sustainability considerations, and use these to evaluate their ideas and designed solutions. They combine design ideas and communicate these to audiences using graphical representation techniques and technical terms. Pupils record project plans including production processes. They select and use appropriate technologies and techniques correctly and safely to produce designed solutions.

Announcement

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Greek Workshop

19 Nov 2019

Year 6 enjoyed a fun-filled day of Ancient Greeks led by Martin. They learnt about the history and difference between Athens and Sparta including how Athens was a democracy and Sparta was an oli...

Cello lessons

11 Nov 2019

Every Thursday morning our Year 6 class are joining Miss Ashby at the Axe Valley Academy for cello lessons.

Maths masterclass

11 Nov 2019

On Thursday 7th November, the second of this year's RI Maths Masterclasses was held at Mrs Ethelston's Primary Academy.  During the afternoon, Year 6 children from across the Multi Academy Trust...

Canoeing fun

10 Jul 2019

On Thursday 27th and Friday 28th June, some of our Year 6 children experienced a canoeing taster day organised by the Axe Vale Canoe Club in Axmouth. They enjoyed paddling up the river beyond Axmouth,...

Royal Maths Institute afternoon

05 Apr 2019

RI Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science Masterclasses are hands-on and interactive extracurricular sessions led by top experts from academia and industry for keen a...

Fabulous Friction!

05 Apr 2019

Colyton Grammar School Science Department came and did a workshop called 'Fabulous Friction!'. Since then, Year 5 have worked hard on their own projects and we now have two entries for the science fai...

World War One Workshop

05 Apr 2019

A World War One soldier visited for Year 5 and 6 to show them what it was like to live during this time.

Magdalen Farm Forest School

11 Dec 2018

Forest School – a day at Magdalen Farm! On Thursday 6th December, Miss Mayes and Mrs Kew had the pleasure of taking six children to Magdalen Farm for a Forest School day.  The purpose of th...

Acorn MAT supports local fallen hero's

15 Nov 2018

Chidren from Axminster Academy, Mrs E's and Chardstock all came together to lay tributes to the 68 men, from the parish of Axminster, who died in WW1. A wonderful service included readign fromthe chil...

Acorn MAT supports local fallen hero's

15 Nov 2018

Chidren from Axminster Academy, Mrs E's and Chardstock all came together to lay tributes to the 68 men, from the parish of Axminster, who died in WW1. A wonderful service included readign fromthe chil...

New lease of life for play area in North Street, Axminster

27 Jun 2018

Axminster Community Primary Academy and Little Acorns @ Axminster are so proud to support this wonderful project. The children really felt a strong desire to improve the local community and I am immen...

Canoeing

08 Jun 2018

14 children from Year 5 and 6 went canoeing on Wednesday 6th June to the Axe Vale Canoe Club in Axmouth. Everyone really enjoyed the day paddling up the estuary and River Axe beyond Axmouth and p...

New arrivals

13 Mar 2018

We have some new arrivals and Beech class are taking full advantage to use them as a model for descriptive sentences! 

World Book Day

09 Mar 2018

On Friday 9th March, the children (and staff) all came into school dressed as a character from their favourite book.  The costumes were amazing!  Thank you to all parents and carers who help...

Early Years Activities

26 Feb 2018

The children in our Early Years Centre have been very busy recently.  They have been talking about their pets and the children and some of our teachers have brought in photos of their animals for...

Maple & Spruce classes

05 Feb 2018

Maple and Spruce class Pupils in Year 3 and 4 have been busy working on their latest topic – Extreme Animals.  The children have discovered a multitude of fascinating facts about animals &...

@Bristol

18 Jul 2017

On Monday 26th June, Spruce and Rowan classes went to @Bristol Science Museum to support their learning of the science curriculum.  They had a fabulous day and were able to learn more about frict...

Sports Day

18 Jul 2017

Today Axminster Community Primary Academy held its annual Sports Day.  Thankfully the recent heatwave was over and we were able to hold the event as scheduled.  Our children excelled in the...

Axe Vale Festival

18 Jul 2017

The children of Spruce and Rowan classes have been working hard, with Mrs Hogarth the Art Teacher, designing a poster on the theme "Axminster Carnival" for the Axe Vale Festival. Although all the chil...

Tadpole update

18 Jul 2017

The tadpoles that Beech Class were studying last term have continued to thrive! 

Election Week

18 Jul 2017

Here at Axminster Community Primary Academy, a decision was made to change the names of our four team colours Red, Blue, Green and Yellow. With the general elections drawing closer, our school council...